The Discovery of Species

As tech-savvy human beings armed with our Pocket Ranger® mobile apps and other excellent technologies, it’s sometimes easy to forget that we’re not just curious explorers or chroniclers of the manufactured and natural worlds. We’re animals, too, and are part of the community of strange and exotic creatures that we investigate and dutifully record. In discovery of the world, we discover something integral to our own being. This year is already a fascinating foray into that very exploration, with several new species coming to light in some of the most inhospitable or least expected environments.

A Tiny Frog in Karnataka, India

This guy's chirp sounds like a cricket's.

Hey there, little fella. [Image: www.techtimes.com/]

The Laterite narrow-mouthed frog was recently discovered in the Indian state of Karnataka in a namesake laterite marsh area that occurs around rural and semi-urban human settlements. It likely remained undocumented because of its diminutive stature—it is roughly the size of a thumbnail. But its discovery in a developed area is instructive and a crisp reminder that, just because there’s an established human presence somewhere, doesn’t mean there’s nothing left to discover!

Creepy-Crawly in the Southern Oregon Coast Range, Oregon

[Image: www.phys.org]

What has eight legs, too many eyes, and probably wears a neon sign that blazes NOPE? Why, Cryptomaster behemoth, of course! [Image: www.phys.org/]

This spider was recently found in the woods of southwestern Oregon. It was named “behemoth” because its size outstrips nearly all of the other nearly 4,100 described Laniatores, and “Cryptomaster” because it’s good at remaining unseen. Thankfully the behemoth, like most spiders, is perhaps as disinterested in us as we are it and keeps itself hidden beneath decaying leaves and fallen trees of the old-growth forests in the Southern Oregon Coast Range.

Octopod says, “Aloha!” in Hawaiian Archipelago

Thanks, Okeanos!

Another previously unknown creature of the deep to grab our attention and make us think about ecosystems beyond our commutes? Thanks, Okeanos! [Image: www.itv.com/]

Researchers also made another many-legged discovery this year: a disarmingly cute octopod scientists are calling “Casper.” The indeterminately friendly octopus has un-muscled arms, with only a single row of the usual suction cups, and beady black eyes set adorably in its milky-white mantle. But Casper hasn’t been much described by researchers beyond its cursory appearance, as it revealed itself to NOAA scientists while Okeanos Explorer, the remotely operated underwater vehicle, explored the Hawaiian Archipelago. What we do know is that it dwells much deeper in the ocean than its known octopus cousins and that the wee cephalopod serves to keep our expectations in check.

I Don’t Think You’re Ready for this Jelly…Near the Mariana Trench

Cue Twilight Zone music.

In an environment called and characterized as the Midnight Zone, it helps to have glowing reproductive organs, which scientists suppose this jellyfish has in the golden orbs that are very likely its gonads. [Image: www.eutopia.buzz/]

The Mariana Trench is one of the last great terrestrial frontiers to thwart explorers and befuddle scientists, and it’s no wonder that it remains a consistent source of discovery and veritable fount of new species. What is a wonder are the extraterrestrial qualities of the creatures that thrive in that deep, dark pit beneath the ocean. The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration is in the midst of conducting a survey of the baseline formation and the areas around the trench that began April 20 and will extend to July 10. Already several new and exciting species have been encountered, but the jellyfish with a “jack-o-lantern meets the future of spaceship engineering” appearance has been a thus-far highlight of the exploration. With more than a month to go, we’d all do well to keep our eyes peeled for more live cam weirdness and intrigue!

Humans are one of the most adaptive and widespread species on the planet, thanks in large part to our combined intelligence and technology. This indispensable combo not only helps us persevere in all sorts of extreme conditions, but also allows us to engage with curiosity in our surroundings. As technologies improve, we are able to explore our world at deeper depths, in greater detail on microscopic and subatomic levels, across more of the electromagnetic spectrum, and sometimes—perhaps just to keep our collective ego in check—right in front of our faces.

*hop*

Or even on our faces! (Happy belated, David!) [Image: www.primogif.com/]

The moral of the story is, of course, that you can get out, explore, and maybe even find a new species in places you have been to before. Our Pocket Ranger® apps are a technology that is here to help. Whether your discovery is new to the scientific community or to you in your observations, it’s your duty as a human to investigate! And it’s always worth the adventure.

Celebrate National Bike Month

Spring means an influx of cyclists on city streets and in state parks, and who could blame them? It’s a truly magical experience to enjoy the great outdoors from the comfort of a saddle. With this in mind, it only makes sense that May is the most appropriate time to celebrate National Bike Month!

National Bike Month.

Get on your bike this month! [Image: http://lacrescent.lib.mn.us/]

The League of American Bicyclists created National Bike Month back in 1956 as a way to highlight the many benefits of regular cycling (a form of regular exercise, environmentally friendly, and a great way to see the outdoors to name a few!). Since its foundation, National Bike Month has grown immensely popular, increasing by more than 62 percent between 2000 and 2013.

There are many events to take part in this month to celebrate National Bike Month. Here are just a few to keep in mind.

Bike to Work Day

Bike commuters.

This is our type of traffic jam. [Image: http://www.bloomberg.com/]

Probably the most well-known facet of National Bike Month is Bike to Work Day, which is a part of Bike to Work Week (currently going on at the time this article was written, May 16–20). Bike to Work Day falls on Friday, May 20 and is exactly what the name describes—it’s a day for people to ride their bikes to work as a show of unity among the cycling community as well as a way to raise awareness to the many benefits of riding a bike.

Different cities across the nation have different ways of celebrating the day. In May 2010, 43 out of 51 of the United States’ largest cities hosted Bike to Work Day events, with Denver clocking in with the highest rate of participation that year. In 2012, Boulder, Colorado had free breakfast available from 11 organizations to its more than 1,200 participants; Bethesda, Maryland unveiled 100 new bike racks; and Chicago offered free tune-ups and balaclavas to riders. San Francisco also makes a huge event of the day every year as they have a humungous cycling community.

Bike to School Day

Kids cycling.

You can go to school AND have fun getting there—who knew, right? [Image: http://www.secondglass.net/]

The first Bike to School Day was in May 2012, and since then it’s become an increasingly popular event. It was inspired by the already popular Walk to School Day, which is typically celebrated nationwide in October. Instead, this event calls for students to hop on their bikes and ride to school on a day in May.

This year’s Bike to School Day already passed on May 4, but 2017’s is already scheduled and will be on May 10!

CycloFemme

Cyclofemme.

Just a bunch of awesome lady cyclists, no big deal. [Image: http://www.wellandgood.com/]

Although this event has also already passed (hosted on Sunday, May 8), it’s worthy of mention regardless. CycloFemme is a day of cycling in recognition of the powerful women in our lives that opted for the freedom to be different and wear pants and ride bikes and break down barriers like a bunch of admirable badasses. It’s a way to empower women to get outdoors and ride their bikes while also getting rid of the stereotypes within this male-dominated sport.

Local Events

Biking.

Now go ride off into the sunset, you bike lovers! [Image: http://www.cyclingespana.com/]

There are many events that can found locally within your own cycling community, too. And if you’re having trouble finding one, then you can plan your own event. It’s a great way to kickstart a cycling fervor in your area (if there isn’t one already slowly building).

As with all your outdoor adventures, make sure you bring our Pocket Ranger® mobile apps with you to enhance your journey. Happy riding!

How the Thermacell® Mosquito Repellent Works

Hello, outdoors folk! We’re here again to talk about our sponsor Thermacell® and its mosquito repellent devices!

Thermacell mosquito repellant logo

Image: www.thermacell.com/

As you probably remember—or perhaps know from personal experience—the devices create a 15’ x 15’ “mosquito protection zone” that also repels other types of flying, biting insects, like black flies and no-see-ums, while being virtually odorless and leaving none of the usual oily residue or acrid perfume of lotion and spray insect repellents. The lanterns, torches, and repellers are used by hunters, gardeners, campers, hikers, military personnel, and folks who just love hanging out on their porch, patio, or in their backyard. But we’ve hardly scratched the surface of HOW the devices work.

The EPA-approved devices have a 98 percent effectiveness rating and have been tested across the globe in swamps, tropical climates, and across the good ol’ U.S. of A. And perhaps the part that makes it so effective is that it is easy to set up and uncomplicated to operate. You simply screw in the butane cartridge and install a blue allethrin-dipped mat, turn the device switch ON, and press the START button.

Once your device is lit, the science comes in. The butane inside the device heats the grill that overlays the mosquito repellent mat. This, in turn, causes the liquid allethrin in the mat to vaporize and diffuse into the air through a process not unlike that of an aromatherapy candle—but much more helpful in the field:

molecules showing diffusion on how mosquito repellant works

Once vaporized, the particles are able to maneuver about the air like a born-and-bred New Yorker through Grand Central—swiftly and without making any eye contact. [Image: www.bbc.co.uk/]

Once vaporized, the allethrin is able to move freely through the air, and in less than 10 minutes, you’ll be enjoying a force field that repels mosquitos and other biting insects. It might even look this cool to your imagination:

boys camping and using thermacell mosquito repellant

“Good thinking, Jordan! Your DMB covers will definitely also help to keep the mosquitos away.” [Image: www.thermacell.com/]

The butane cartridge lasts for 12 hours and the repellent mat last for four hours, which is plenty of time to settle your poker game or reel a couple of fish in for dinner—or both. And since changing them out is such a breeze, if the poker game runs long, the fish aren’t biting, or you just want to enjoy the sounds of nature at dusk, twilight, midnight, or later, you’ll have the back-up you need.

Negroni, anyone?

“Ha ha, excellent! I haven’t had a mosquito up my nose in over an hour!” “I haven’t, either! These torches are great!” [Image: www.thermacell.com/]

Of course, nature is the boss whenever we step outside. and high winds are a natural deterrent to both mosquitos and the benefit of a device that repels them. When using a Thermacell product, it is best to choose an outdoor location where there is little wind or minimal air movement. When you’ve found a spot of relative calm, the Thermacell product is most effective when placed near the ground. If there is some wind where you are hoping to use the appliance or lantern, you’ll have the best results if you place it upwind of your work or relaxation space so that when the breeze comes, it brings the repellent along with it.

And if you’re like your author here, when someone tells you that a product works great, you definitely want to try it for yourself before you buy into the hype. Thermacell, like all companies that have faith in their products, offers a full refund if you find yourself dissatisfied with the results. So gear up with your Thermacell appliance and Pocket Ranger® mobile app, and get in the field!

Beach Safety

Ah, springtime, how we’ve missed you and your warm embrace so. With spring comes, of course, the warm weather, longer daylight hours, and eventually the long-awaited summer.

Sometimes it feels like summer is years away (especially lately here on the East Coast where we’ve been experiencing some not-very-spring-like temperatures and lots of rain), but in fact, summer is actually pretty close. And with summer brings two of our favorite things: sun and sand.

If you’re planning to make your way to the beach this summer, there a few things to keep in mind so you end up having a relaxing time outdoors. After all, what else is more relaxing than spreading out under an umbrella on the sand in front of the water? Beaches are practically made to be stress-free!

California beach.

Seriously, this photo just radiates “relaxation.” [Image: http://fineartamerica.com/]

Friends that swim together don’t get separated in dangerous riptides together.

Probably the most dangerous thing you can encounter at the beach are rip currents. They’ll pull and push you around, and before you know it, you’re farther from the beach than you feel comfortable being. A rip current can be deadly, so knowing how to look out for one and what to do if you find yourself caught in the tide is important for all beach-goers.

From the shore, you can see where riptides are occurring due to the sandy-colored areas where the current is pulling sand from the bottom as they form. You can also see darker water, which tells you that it may be a deeper area that a rip current has formed in. Oftentimes, you can see choppy water in those areas, and you may even see seaweed and foam moving in lines.

Swimming.

What are you waiting for? Get in that water! [Image: http://www.asiantour.com/]

The most important thing to remember if you get caught in a riptide is to not panic. If you feel yourself being pulled, you should swim perpendicular to that pull (typically this is parallel to the shoreline) until you don’t feel its tug any longer. If you can’t swim away from it, float until you no longer feel the pull and then make your way back to shore. Or if none of these options is feasible, wave your arms and call out to a lifeguard that you need help.

Relax. “Jaws” is not at all indicative of a normal beach experience.

Shark attacks are incredibly rare—you’ve probably heard the comparison that you have a higher chance of being struck by lightning or of being in a fatal car accident than you doing being attacked by a shark. In the U.S., there are an average of 16 shark attacks each year, with only one being fatal every two years.

But maybe it’s not the unlikely odds that scare you; maybe you’re just afraid of being unprepared, which is totally reasonable. So here’s what you can do if you find yourself near a shark.

Sharks with human teeth.

Another tip: Picturing sharks with human teeth makes them way less intimidating. [Image: http://distractify.com/]

Before you head into the water, you should avoid drawing attention to yourself in a way that might be appealing to a shark. That means don’t go into the water if you’re even slightly bleeding or menstruating, don’t wear bright colors or jewelry that could catch a shark’s eye, and don’t splash around excessively.

If you take all the proper precautions and still find yourself facing off with a shark, your best bet is to hit them in one of their sensitive areas (snout, eyes, or gills). Unlike how people say you should play dead if you’re attacked by a bear, you should fight against a shark with everything you have.

I scream, you scream, we all scream for sunscreen.

Sunscreen.

Putting sunscreen on might feel like a pain to do, but it’s even worse dealing with the aftermath of a bad sunburn. [Image: http://ryot.huffingtonpost.com/]

Melanoma is no joke, and beach-goers should be especially keen to apply generous amounts of sunscreen throughout the day when spending time at the beach. SPF 15 or higher is advised, depending on how easily you tend to burn. Additionally, keeping yourself in shady areas or wearing a hat are also helpful for avoiding excessive sunburn.

Prolonged exposure to the sun as well as dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion, heat stroke, or even sun poisoning. You’ll know if you’re experiencing one of these illnesses if you feel dizzy, fatigued, have a headache, have muscle cramps, your skin is pale, you’re sweating a lot or not at all, your heart is racing, you have a fever, and through many other symptoms. If you think you have one of these conditions, remove unnecessary clothing, drink more water, cool off in a bath or shower, or seek a medical professional.

Fish are friends, not food. And also not something you should really mess around with in general.

Even though going to the beach is usually reserved for vacations or days off, it’s best to keep in mind that you’re in the home of many different ocean animals and plants. As always, go into a park or beach with respect for the wildlife that live there and for the environment that you’re also enjoying.

That being said, there are plenty of creatures that you’ll come across at the beach that you might want to avoid. This includes crabs, jellyfish, mussels, clams, and barnacles to name a few. If you don’t want to get scraped, stung, or pinched, then be careful of where you tread and swim!

Crabs everywhere.

Just watch where you step! [Image: https://www.reddit.com/]

Hopefully these tips are early enough to prepare you for beach season this year. Stock up now on sunscreen, sandals, bathing suits, umbrellas, and all the other fun things to take to the beach. And, as always, make sure to bring your Pocket Ranger® mobile apps with you to make exploring and relaxing even easier!

Crowdfunding and a Constitutional Amendment

When we talk about state parks and state parks systems, we’re discussing the interweaving natures of the hard work and bureaucracy that make up anything that is government-run. It’s sometimes tricky, that political stuff, and not as fun as taking a hike or having a picnic with your favorite people. But no matter how far they seem from watching a sunset or listening to water cascade through a gorge, funding and votes and the internet are all important aspects of the preservation and enjoyment of our natural resources. Those resources, along with volunteering, friends groups, and even crowdfunding, have a role in the future of our parks and how we are able to interact with nature. Here are a couple of current events that elaborate on that point!

The Ball is in Your Court, Alabama Voters!

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Nature!

When we think of our favorite state parks, we don’t often think of stuffy legislative chambers, but there is no state parks system without them. [Image: www.alabamapolicy.org/]

Last September, we wrote a blog post about how the Alabama State Parks Division was facing a budget crisis that would result in the closure of five state parks on October 15. When the deadline hit, several of the parks began the road to closure. But because of the influence the parks have on local economies—particularly in terms of tourism revenue, sales of gas, and groceries—Florala was adopted by the City of Florala, and Dallas County made an agreement with the state to keep Paul Grist open for business.

Lovely water view, nearly lost to mismanagement of funds.

It’d be an injustice to lose access to the soothing views at Paul M. Grist State Park. Thanks for sparing us, Dallas County! [Image: www.ruralswalabama.org/]

As a quick refresher, the crisis boiled down to the transfer of more than $30 million out of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources coffers (half of which came from the state parks) over five years. That money settled in the state’s General Fund and was then distributed to cover deficits in other government agencies.

On March 22, the Alabama House of Representatives, in response to community backlash after those five parks were defunded, set in motion an amendment to the state’s constitution that would protect the state parks system’s funding from those damning transfers. The people of Alabama will get to vote on the state parks’ futures in November, and if the amendment passes, the parks will be guaranteed the revenue they earn, which will dramatically improve the parks department’s ability to maintain and make progress.

3 pts!

That’s right, the ball’s in your court—you’ve got this, Alabama! [Image: www.gifbin.com/]

Build some Cabins, Build the Future!

Speaking of making progress: Cape Henlopen State Park is a popular and polished jewel in the crown of Delaware’s state parks system, and it is seeking your help. The park started a Kickstarter campaign succinctly named “Help Us Bring More Camping Cabins to Cape Henlopen State Park.” The park is seeking to offset some of the costs of building new cabins that will be ready to serve the public by Memorial Day. By backing the campaign, you can earn great rewards, like being the first to stay in one of the new cabins. Or if you pledge at the top tier, you can act as the park manager for a day.

Beach views for days!

Clearly Cape Henlopen State Park is a pretty special place. And you can make wonderful memories here or contribute to someone else’s by helping the park in its Kickstarter campaign! [Image: www.detsa.org/]

Thousands of visitors make their way from across the First State and farther to take in its ocean and bayside beaches, historic fort and lighthouse, dune-strewn scenery, and its many well-kept amenities. But it, as all state parks and state parks systems, is subject to budgets (and budget cuts) and grant allocations from state or federal sources, since the cost of keeping the lights on and maintaining facilities is almost always greater than what is brought in by the monies collected for park use, like day-use entry fees or the price of a campsite. These fees are generally kept to a minimum or are non-existent because these beautiful, natural spaces are meant to be accessible to everyone. Crowdfunding is a way to directly impact the park and its projects if you can’t get out and help clear a trail, remove fallen trees, paint buildings, or any of the other types of tasks one might do while volunteering. With technology, there are a million ways you can be a force for good in the state parks world.

Or if you’re more the immediate action, hands-on type, visiting a state park is always the best advocacy for their relevance and importance in our modern lives. You can, as always, download the Pocket Ranger® mobile apps and plan your trip today!

Avoiding Animal Heat Stress

On Earth Day, Sambo, an approximately 40–45 year old elephant, dropped dead from heart failure and extreme heat exhaustion after walking for 40 minutes in 40° Celsius weather in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The irony of an elephant dying on Earth Day surely didn’t escape many. It’s a sad event to see that an elephant has been overworked in such intense heat without anyone caring for its physiological needs. One of the questions that begs to be answered then is: How can we avoid animal heat stress?

sambo the elephant

Sambo was only one of the many elephants used as a tourist attraction in Cambodia. She had been working for Angkor Elephant Company since 2001, part of a couple of elephants made to bring tourists to the popular Cambodian temple complex, Angkor Wat. [Image: www.dankoehl.blogspot.com/]

During summer, animals experience heat stress. As temperatures rise, medical risks, such as heat stroke and heart attack, are common symptoms of heat stress for animals. Below are some tips to help keep animals well-cared for in the summer.

Provide easy access to water and shade.

dog tub

This dog is spending his summer in the best way possible: Chilling in his very own pool with other “friends.” [Image: www.opensecretsdc.tumblr.com/]

Summers can be brutal—they can make one dehydrated if there isn’t enough water ready to replenish the system. Shade is also another vital companion to prevent constant exposure to extreme heat, making both water and shade critical aspects of properly caring for animals.

Handle only when the time is right.

playful cat

“But what do you mean I can’t go outside and play? I want to!” [Image: www.wallpaperswide.com/]

It is highly recommended that all handling activities—this includes training animals—be postponed to dates or changed to times when the heat isn’t as intense. The reason for this is that some animals have less of a tolerance to heat than others, and any movement under such high temperatures outside can easily increase the animals’ internal body temperature.

Know heat stroke indications.

grizzly bear bathing

A grizzly bear luxuriously bathing in a creek. [Image: www.grizzlybearblog.wordpress.com/]

Fortunately, heat stroke has a few key identifiable factors. Here are a few:

  • High body temperature (above 104° F/40° C)
  • Altered mental state or behavior
  • Alteration in sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Rapid breathing

Animals are vulnerable to heat stress and heat stroke, so it is important to be able to identify key signs of behavior and physiological symptoms in order to take care of them properly.

This summer, there’s no need to put your animals in danger. And as always, with the help of your Pocket Ranger® mobile apps, you can go out and have some unforgettable adventures together! Make the sun a friend and not a nemesis.

Three Beautiful Lighthouses to Visit this Year

Contributed by Katie Levy of Adventure-Inspired

Though in many cases lighthouses are no longer a necessity when it comes to travel by sea, they’re still fascinating landmarks and beacons to behold. Many have important histories and meanings, while others are significant simply because they’re beautiful sights to take in. While some coastal landscapes boast a high concentration of lighthouses, to me there are three that stand out as must-visit destinations in the warmer weather to come.

Punta Gorda Lighthouse, King Range National Conservation Area, California

From the beautiful lighthouses blog; view of Punta Gorda Lighthouse

Image: Katie Levy

Nestled above a sandy beach and below rolling hills and mountains, the tiny abandoned Punta Gorda Lighthouse serves as a landmark for Lost Coast Trail backpackers. It’s also a perfect day-hiking destination for those willing to walk three miles one-way in the sand on one of California’s most remote stretches of coastal trail and also willing to pay close attention to tide tables.

Punta Gorda was once dubbed “the Alcatraz of Lighthouses” because of its inaccessibility and those sent there to operate it. Originally consisting of three two-story dwellings, a signal house, a concrete light building with a curved iron stairway, and more, the lighthouse was abandoned in 1951 in favor of an off-shore beacon. Punta Gorda has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1976, and both the inaccessibility and history make it well-worth the visit.

Friends and I paid a visit to Punta Gorda on a backpacking trip along the Lost Coast Trail, and our stop there made for some incredible memories. We climbed up what’s left of the lighthouse to hold court over the harbor seals basking in the sun on the beach, listened to the waves crash below, and saw miles of trail we’d covered already, along with what was to come. It’s a pretty special place.

Visit the BLM website for more information.

Bass Harbor Head Light, Acadia National Park, Maine

From the beautiful lighthouses blog; view of Bass Harbor

Image: Katie Levy

Standing tall above Bass Harbor’s rocky coastline within Acadia National Park, the Bass Harbor Head Light has served as a beacon for travelers since the late 1800s. Today it’s on the National Register of Historic Places, but remains active and serves as a private residence for a local Coast Guard member and his family.

On a trip to Acadia last summer, I had the lighthouse at the top of my must-visit landmarks list as a result of the number of stunning photos I’d seen. Unlike the remote Punta Gorda lighthouse, Acadia’s Bass Harbor Head Light is accessible via short concrete path from a small parking lot. A short walk takes visitors from the comforts of their vehicles to within inches of Maine’s rugged coastline. Friends and I stopped there after a long day of hiking, and despite not having to work too hard to get there, the Bass Harbor Head Light was a worthwhile visit.

Visit the National Park Service website for more information, and click here and here for some of my favorite hikes in Acadia.

Tibbets Point Lighthouse, Cape Vincent, New York

From the beautiful lighthouses blog; view of Tibbetts Point

Image: Katie Levy

I was lucky enough to spend many a summer during my formative years in the Thousand Islands region of New York. The Thousand Islands—a collection of close to 2,000 islands in the St. Lawrence River straddling the border between the United States and Canada—is also home to a number of big, beautiful lighthouses. My favorite? The lighthouse at Tibbetts Point in Cape Vincent, New York.

The Tibbetts Point Lighthouse was built in 1827, and in the 1990s, the lighthouse was formally acquired by the town from the Department of the Interior. I have fond memories of visiting the visitors center as a child, which was built in 1993. Over the past nearly two decades, the Tibbetts Point Lighthouse Society funded a series of renovations both inside and outside of the lighthouse.

The Tibbetts Point Lighthouse is particularly special because it marks the point where Lake Ontario meets the St. Lawrence River, and it’s one of the best places to watch the sun set in that part of the state, in my humble opinion!

Visit the town’s website for more information.

There are so many beautiful lighthouses to visit around the country and around the world! Have you been to any of these? What others would you say are must-visit lighthouses, and why?