Category Archives: Like It

National Get Outdoors Day

Want an excuse to have an outdoor adventure? Well, to be honest, you really don’t need an excuse—if anything, you probably need a reason not to get out there instead! Whether you’re looking for a reason or an excuse, though, it is now here in the form of National Get Outdoors Day.

Saturday, June 11 is this year’s National Get Outdoors Day, and you can partake in some amazing outdoor adventures at a local state or national park. Here are just some of specific events that you can enjoy with your loved ones!

People outdoors.

It’s time to explore the great outdoors! [Image: http://theadventureblog.blogspot.com/]

Upper Kern Cleanup, California

The Sequoia Recreation, which is a division of the California Land Management within the U.S. Forest Service, meets every year on the second weekend of June (this year, they’ll be meeting on June 11) to join together and clean the Upper Kern area. The Kern River is a valuable resource as a clean and safe waterway, and volunteers work relentlessly each year to ensure that its remains as such.

Learn more information here.

Get Outdoors Family Fishing Picnic, Pennsylvania

Bring your whole family out for a relaxing fishing trip on Sunday, June 12 at the Tussey Mountain Pond. They’ll provide the tackle for anyone who wants to join in on this idyllic Sunday afternoon. So bring your rods and see what you can hook!

Learn more information here.

Kid in a log.

Peek-a-boo! [Image: http://www.getoutdoorscolorado.org/]

Loop Lake Shelbyville Bike Ride, Illinois

If you’re searching for an end of spring bike-venture, then look no further than Loop Lake Shelbyville ride! There are three options for cyclists of all levels: a short 22-mile ride, a medium length 46-miles, and a longer 65-mile trek. So whether this is your first time around the lake, so to speak, or you’re a seasoned bike tourer, this is a great way to get outside and enjoy yourself!

Learn more information here.

Family biking.

Nothing like a family bike ride! [Image: https://totalwomenscycling.com/]

Get Outdoors Adventure Awaits Expo, Washington

Looking to try a new outdoor activity? Then look no further than the National Get Outdoors Day Outdoor Expo at Millersylvania State Park on June 11! It’s a fun day for the whole family, filled with prizes, demos, kid activities, and the chance to learn about (or even try!) a new outdoor activity. It’s the perfect place to be if you’re looking to fill your summer up with outdoor fun.

Learn more information here.

This is just a sample of all the many parks that will be holding events this weekend for National Get Outdoors Day. You can find more participating areas here. And before you go, don’t forget to make sure you download your state’s Pocket Ranger® mobile app so you can make the best of your adventure. Happy travels!

Some Facts About Mosquitoes

Conjecture: Mosquitoes are probably the most annoying insects on the planet. Fact: They are one of the most dangerous animals on the planet. They’re a source of discomfort, a vector for disease, and they seem to be everywhere we are when enjoying nature, or lately, even just reading the news. Here at Pocket Ranger®, we and our sponsor Thermacell® want to talk about this pest that has brought itself to the forefront of our thoughts as the weather improves and we are drawn outdoors. We’re here to discuss the facts while underlining the importance of mosquito bite prevention.

mosquitoes are the worst.

The Aedes aegypti mosquito enjoying a meal. It’s astonishing the lengths folks will take to photograph these hungry blighters. [Image: www.cdc.gov/]

The Obvious

  • Mosquitoes make up the family Culicidae, approximately 3,500 flying, biting insect species best known for drinking blood from mammals, reptiles, birds, and basically anything else with blood they can sink their proboscises into. They tend to be crepuscular feeders, taking their meals at dawn or dusk.
  • In most mosquito species, female mosquitoes drink blood for protein that is essential to produce eggs before or after mating. Some species are capable of drinking as much as three times their bodyweight.
  • Particularly before they begin mating, female mosquitoes, like their male counterparts, subsist on the sugar from fruit and flower nectar.
  • The mosquito is a food source for birds, bats, amphibians, reptiles, and other animals, despite being a fairly well adapted hunter itself.

Mosquitoes in the U. S. of A.

A map showing mosquito ranges

This map shows the potential ranges of the invasive mosquito species Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictis in the United States, but does not detail the mosquitoes’ populations or risk of disease transmission. Aedes aegypti is a known carrier of the Zika Virus. Aedes albopictis is not confirmed as a vector here, but could become a viable transmitter of Zika and other diseases. [Image: www.cdc.gov/]

Though West Nile Virus is now endemic in California, mosquito-borne illnesses like Chikungunya, Yellow Fever, Dengue, Malaria, and other dangerous infections are not common in the continental United States. From a historical standpoint, and as a sweeping general rule, the roughly 200 species of mosquitoes in the U.S. tend to be a nuisance to folks spending time outdoors rather than a transmitter of diseases. We’ve been very fortunate in that way.

However, these days, particularly while discussing mosquitoes, we can’t help but talk about the very present context of the Zika Virus and other mosquito-borne diseases. Aedes aegypti has been indicated as the primary agent of Zika, largely because it favors living in close proximity to its preferred food source: humans. Aedes aegypti enjoys a comfortable potential range that would extend throughout much of the southern and coastal portions of the U.S. where weather and temperature are a bit more within the mosquito’s varied tropical, sub-tropical, and temperate preferences. And, well, it’s just good practice to prevent or avoid mosquito bites by any reasonable means, regardless of Zika or any other illness, no matter where you live.

Ways to Naturally Prevent Mosquito Bites and Hinder Population Growth

[Image: www.mosquitomagnet.com]

It looks like a great place to clean your feathers, but it’s not a good idea to have one of these hanging around without also having a way to mitigate the mosquito eggs that could hatch from the waters. [Image: www.mosquitomagnet.com/]

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states on its website, “The best way to prevent Zika and other viruses spread through mosquito bites is to prevent mosquito bites.” Well, when you put it like that, CDC! Thankfully, there are many easy and natural ways to reduce the incidence of mosquito presence and mosquito bites.

  • Wear protective clothing. You can wear long sleeves and pants to reduce the area a mosquito can dig in. Or if it’s just too unbearable to wear that much fabric, you can wear bug spray, DEET, or any number of other topical remedies. Just be sure if you’re wearing sunscreen. too, you apply insect repellent last. Or, as we’ll get to in a minute, there’s an alternative to any of that smelly stuff.
  • If the water’s standing, flip it over. Or use it to water a plant. Birdbaths may be quaint, but they are mosquito nurseries. Rainwater repositories, horse or livestock water troughs, your dog’s outside water bowl, a non-aerated koi pond, and any other number of vestibules and yard items can contribute to your home’s immediate mosquito population. You can mitigate this by simply taking steps to make sure water isn’t sitting or stagnating for days after rain.
  • Herbs and flowers can save your skin. You can plant and grow mosquito repellent plants. Do some research about what grows best in your climate, but trust in the staples like peppermint, lemongrass, basil, garlic, the popular citronella, and even catnip! Most of these plants can be bought already grown, are fairly easy to maintain, and have uses beyond driving bugs away.
  • Choose a repeller you trust. In the spirit of saving the very best for last, you’re probably aware by now that there’s a virtually odorless mosquito repellent with a 98 percent effectiveness rating that requires no oily bodily application. Our favorite way to reduce the chance of mosquito bites is with Thermacell® appliances that wield allethrin, a synthetic copy of the natural mosquito repellent found in chrysanthemums that forms a 15′ by 15′ shield around your outdoor work or hangout space. You can find out how this terrific tool works here.

Thermacell logo.

A combination of all these solutions are the ideal way of reducing incidence of mosquito interaction around your home or campsite, but you’d do well to keep your Thermacell appliance nearby wherever you are. [Image: www.thermacell.com/]

For all the frustration mosquitoes might impose on our lives, the world is just too great and offers too many nature-packed reasons to warrant a life confined to netted spaces or freezing climates. Download a Pocket Ranger® mobile app, gear up with your Thermacell®, get out there, and explore!

Adventure Cycling Bike Events

Spring and summer bring about an increase in organized cycling tours, which can be found across the country, as well as National Bike Month each May. But in addition to the already existing events, Missoula, Montana based Adventure Cycling is working to create a few more national bike holidays.

Cycling.

Just imagine what awaits you out there. [Image: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/548102217121796509/]

If you’re looking for an opportunity to connect with other cyclists and rejoice in the joys of bike riding (because who doesn’t want that?), these are some of the upcoming days to celebrate.

Bike Travel Weekend, June 3–5

Bike tour.

Make sure you pack all the essentials! [Image: http://kidproject.org/]

In just a few weeks, you can celebrate the first annual Bike Travel Weekend with your cycling loved ones. Whether you want to commemorate riding 100 miles over the course of two days or you just want to take a brief 15 mile ride around your local city and camp out nearby, there’s no wrong way to celebrate. It’s the largest weekend of bike overnights across the U.S. and Canada. It’s a way for new and seasoned riders to get outside and get riding!

You can check out their interactive map to see if there’s an organized ride happening near you, or you can officially register your own overnight ride for the weekend.

Montana Bicycle Celebration, July 15–17

This event may be a bit easier to attend if you’re close to Missoula, but maybe after getting more information, you’ll want to plan a vacation that lands you in Montana between July 15 and 17! It’s going to be a bike-filled weekend, including rides on the Bitterroot Trail, a ribbon cutting ceremony to announce a new section of the same trail, a bike expo at Silver Park, and much more. There’s also the chance to win a Salsa Marrakesh touring bike if you buy tickets!

Head to Adventure Cycling’s site to obtain more information about this upcoming event.

Bike Your Park Day, September 24

Friends biking.

Friends that bike together…are probably in amazing shape and have seen some really beautiful sights…together. [Image: http://www.colorado.com/]

This is an event that we can especially get behind! It’s your chance to join thousands of other cyclists and explore your favorite state park from the comfort of your saddle. This event celebrates multiple milestones in one day: the National Park Service’s centennial, Adventure Cycling’s 40th anniversary, and National Public Lands Day. Again, the best part of this event is that there aren’t very many requirements—you can bike as many miles as you want with as large of a group as you want. It’s your day to play around in a park, so don’t let it pass you by!

Learn more information about Bike Your Park Day here.

Friends biking with their helmets in the air.

Throw your helmets up and c-e-l-e-b-r-a-t-e! [Image: https://www.tripadvisor.com/]

With these events to look forward to, your summer is sure to be full of biking and outdoor fun. With that in mind, don’t forget to bring our Pocket Ranger® mobile apps with you on those ventures. Happy cycling!

The Discovery of Species

As tech-savvy human beings armed with our Pocket Ranger® mobile apps and other excellent technologies, it’s sometimes easy to forget that we’re not just curious explorers or chroniclers of the manufactured and natural worlds. We’re animals, too, and are part of the community of strange and exotic creatures that we investigate and dutifully record. In discovery of the world, we discover something integral to our own being. This year is already a fascinating foray into that very exploration, with several new species coming to light in some of the most inhospitable or least expected environments.

A Tiny Frog in Karnataka, India

This guy's chirp sounds like a cricket's.

Hey there, little fella. [Image: www.techtimes.com/]

The Laterite narrow-mouthed frog was recently discovered in the Indian state of Karnataka in a namesake laterite marsh area that occurs around rural and semi-urban human settlements. It likely remained undocumented because of its diminutive stature—it is roughly the size of a thumbnail. But its discovery in a developed area is instructive and a crisp reminder that, just because there’s an established human presence somewhere, doesn’t mean there’s nothing left to discover!

Creepy-Crawly in the Southern Oregon Coast Range, Oregon

[Image: www.phys.org]

What has eight legs, too many eyes, and probably wears a neon sign that blazes NOPE? Why, Cryptomaster behemoth, of course! [Image: www.phys.org/]

This spider was recently found in the woods of southwestern Oregon. It was named “behemoth” because its size outstrips nearly all of the other nearly 4,100 described Laniatores, and “Cryptomaster” because it’s good at remaining unseen. Thankfully the behemoth, like most spiders, is perhaps as disinterested in us as we are it and keeps itself hidden beneath decaying leaves and fallen trees of the old-growth forests in the Southern Oregon Coast Range.

Octopod says, “Aloha!” in Hawaiian Archipelago

Thanks, Okeanos!

Another previously unknown creature of the deep to grab our attention and make us think about ecosystems beyond our commutes? Thanks, Okeanos! [Image: www.itv.com/]

Researchers also made another many-legged discovery this year: a disarmingly cute octopod scientists are calling “Casper.” The indeterminately friendly octopus has un-muscled arms, with only a single row of the usual suction cups, and beady black eyes set adorably in its milky-white mantle. But Casper hasn’t been much described by researchers beyond its cursory appearance, as it revealed itself to NOAA scientists while Okeanos Explorer, the remotely operated underwater vehicle, explored the Hawaiian Archipelago. What we do know is that it dwells much deeper in the ocean than its known octopus cousins and that the wee cephalopod serves to keep our expectations in check.

I Don’t Think You’re Ready for this Jelly…Near the Mariana Trench

Cue Twilight Zone music.

In an environment called and characterized as the Midnight Zone, it helps to have glowing reproductive organs, which scientists suppose this jellyfish has in the golden orbs that are very likely its gonads. [Image: www.eutopia.buzz/]

The Mariana Trench is one of the last great terrestrial frontiers to thwart explorers and befuddle scientists, and it’s no wonder that it remains a consistent source of discovery and veritable fount of new species. What is a wonder are the extraterrestrial qualities of the creatures that thrive in that deep, dark pit beneath the ocean. The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration is in the midst of conducting a survey of the baseline formation and the areas around the trench that began April 20 and will extend to July 10. Already several new and exciting species have been encountered, but the jellyfish with a “jack-o-lantern meets the future of spaceship engineering” appearance has been a thus-far highlight of the exploration. With more than a month to go, we’d all do well to keep our eyes peeled for more live cam weirdness and intrigue!

Humans are one of the most adaptive and widespread species on the planet, thanks in large part to our combined intelligence and technology. This indispensable combo not only helps us persevere in all sorts of extreme conditions, but also allows us to engage with curiosity in our surroundings. As technologies improve, we are able to explore our world at deeper depths, in greater detail on microscopic and subatomic levels, across more of the electromagnetic spectrum, and sometimes—perhaps just to keep our collective ego in check—right in front of our faces.

*hop*

Or even on our faces! (Happy belated, David!) [Image: www.primogif.com/]

The moral of the story is, of course, that you can get out, explore, and maybe even find a new species in places you have been to before. Our Pocket Ranger® apps are a technology that is here to help. Whether your discovery is new to the scientific community or to you in your observations, it’s your duty as a human to investigate! And it’s always worth the adventure.

Celebrate National Bike Month

Spring means an influx of cyclists on city streets and in state parks, and who could blame them? It’s a truly magical experience to enjoy the great outdoors from the comfort of a saddle. With this in mind, it only makes sense that May is the most appropriate time to celebrate National Bike Month!

National Bike Month.

Get on your bike this month! [Image: http://lacrescent.lib.mn.us/]

The League of American Bicyclists created National Bike Month back in 1956 as a way to highlight the many benefits of regular cycling (a form of regular exercise, environmentally friendly, and a great way to see the outdoors to name a few!). Since its foundation, National Bike Month has grown immensely popular, increasing by more than 62 percent between 2000 and 2013.

There are many events to take part in this month to celebrate National Bike Month. Here are just a few to keep in mind.

Bike to Work Day

Bike commuters.

This is our type of traffic jam. [Image: http://www.bloomberg.com/]

Probably the most well-known facet of National Bike Month is Bike to Work Day, which is a part of Bike to Work Week (currently going on at the time this article was written, May 16–20). Bike to Work Day falls on Friday, May 20 and is exactly what the name describes—it’s a day for people to ride their bikes to work as a show of unity among the cycling community as well as a way to raise awareness to the many benefits of riding a bike.

Different cities across the nation have different ways of celebrating the day. In May 2010, 43 out of 51 of the United States’ largest cities hosted Bike to Work Day events, with Denver clocking in with the highest rate of participation that year. In 2012, Boulder, Colorado had free breakfast available from 11 organizations to its more than 1,200 participants; Bethesda, Maryland unveiled 100 new bike racks; and Chicago offered free tune-ups and balaclavas to riders. San Francisco also makes a huge event of the day every year as they have a humungous cycling community.

Bike to School Day

Kids cycling.

You can go to school AND have fun getting there—who knew, right? [Image: http://www.secondglass.net/]

The first Bike to School Day was in May 2012, and since then it’s become an increasingly popular event. It was inspired by the already popular Walk to School Day, which is typically celebrated nationwide in October. Instead, this event calls for students to hop on their bikes and ride to school on a day in May.

This year’s Bike to School Day already passed on May 4, but 2017’s is already scheduled and will be on May 10!

CycloFemme

Cyclofemme.

Just a bunch of awesome lady cyclists, no big deal. [Image: http://www.wellandgood.com/]

Although this event has also already passed (hosted on Sunday, May 8), it’s worthy of mention regardless. CycloFemme is a day of cycling in recognition of the powerful women in our lives that opted for the freedom to be different and wear pants and ride bikes and break down barriers like a bunch of admirable badasses. It’s a way to empower women to get outdoors and ride their bikes while also getting rid of the stereotypes within this male-dominated sport.

Local Events

Biking.

Now go ride off into the sunset, you bike lovers! [Image: http://www.cyclingespana.com/]

There are many events that can found locally within your own cycling community, too. And if you’re having trouble finding one, then you can plan your own event. It’s a great way to kickstart a cycling fervor in your area (if there isn’t one already slowly building).

As with all your outdoor adventures, make sure you bring our Pocket Ranger® mobile apps with you to enhance your journey. Happy riding!

Beach Safety

Ah, springtime, how we’ve missed you and your warm embrace so. With spring comes, of course, the warm weather, longer daylight hours, and eventually the long-awaited summer.

Sometimes it feels like summer is years away (especially lately here on the East Coast where we’ve been experiencing some not-very-spring-like temperatures and lots of rain), but in fact, summer is actually pretty close. And with summer brings two of our favorite things: sun and sand.

If you’re planning to make your way to the beach this summer, there a few things to keep in mind so you end up having a relaxing time outdoors. After all, what else is more relaxing than spreading out under an umbrella on the sand in front of the water? Beaches are practically made to be stress-free!

California beach.

Seriously, this photo just radiates “relaxation.” [Image: http://fineartamerica.com/]

Friends that swim together don’t get separated in dangerous riptides together.

Probably the most dangerous thing you can encounter at the beach are rip currents. They’ll pull and push you around, and before you know it, you’re farther from the beach than you feel comfortable being. A rip current can be deadly, so knowing how to look out for one and what to do if you find yourself caught in the tide is important for all beach-goers.

From the shore, you can see where riptides are occurring due to the sandy-colored areas where the current is pulling sand from the bottom as they form. You can also see darker water, which tells you that it may be a deeper area that a rip current has formed in. Oftentimes, you can see choppy water in those areas, and you may even see seaweed and foam moving in lines.

Swimming.

What are you waiting for? Get in that water! [Image: http://www.asiantour.com/]

The most important thing to remember if you get caught in a riptide is to not panic. If you feel yourself being pulled, you should swim perpendicular to that pull (typically this is parallel to the shoreline) until you don’t feel its tug any longer. If you can’t swim away from it, float until you no longer feel the pull and then make your way back to shore. Or if none of these options is feasible, wave your arms and call out to a lifeguard that you need help.

Relax. “Jaws” is not at all indicative of a normal beach experience.

Shark attacks are incredibly rare—you’ve probably heard the comparison that you have a higher chance of being struck by lightning or of being in a fatal car accident than you doing being attacked by a shark. In the U.S., there are an average of 16 shark attacks each year, with only one being fatal every two years.

But maybe it’s not the unlikely odds that scare you; maybe you’re just afraid of being unprepared, which is totally reasonable. So here’s what you can do if you find yourself near a shark.

Sharks with human teeth.

Another tip: Picturing sharks with human teeth makes them way less intimidating. [Image: http://distractify.com/]

Before you head into the water, you should avoid drawing attention to yourself in a way that might be appealing to a shark. That means don’t go into the water if you’re even slightly bleeding or menstruating, don’t wear bright colors or jewelry that could catch a shark’s eye, and don’t splash around excessively.

If you take all the proper precautions and still find yourself facing off with a shark, your best bet is to hit them in one of their sensitive areas (snout, eyes, or gills). Unlike how people say you should play dead if you’re attacked by a bear, you should fight against a shark with everything you have.

I scream, you scream, we all scream for sunscreen.

Sunscreen.

Putting sunscreen on might feel like a pain to do, but it’s even worse dealing with the aftermath of a bad sunburn. [Image: http://ryot.huffingtonpost.com/]

Melanoma is no joke, and beach-goers should be especially keen to apply generous amounts of sunscreen throughout the day when spending time at the beach. SPF 15 or higher is advised, depending on how easily you tend to burn. Additionally, keeping yourself in shady areas or wearing a hat are also helpful for avoiding excessive sunburn.

Prolonged exposure to the sun as well as dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion, heat stroke, or even sun poisoning. You’ll know if you’re experiencing one of these illnesses if you feel dizzy, fatigued, have a headache, have muscle cramps, your skin is pale, you’re sweating a lot or not at all, your heart is racing, you have a fever, and through many other symptoms. If you think you have one of these conditions, remove unnecessary clothing, drink more water, cool off in a bath or shower, or seek a medical professional.

Fish are friends, not food. And also not something you should really mess around with in general.

Even though going to the beach is usually reserved for vacations or days off, it’s best to keep in mind that you’re in the home of many different ocean animals and plants. As always, go into a park or beach with respect for the wildlife that live there and for the environment that you’re also enjoying.

That being said, there are plenty of creatures that you’ll come across at the beach that you might want to avoid. This includes crabs, jellyfish, mussels, clams, and barnacles to name a few. If you don’t want to get scraped, stung, or pinched, then be careful of where you tread and swim!

Crabs everywhere.

Just watch where you step! [Image: https://www.reddit.com/]

Hopefully these tips are early enough to prepare you for beach season this year. Stock up now on sunscreen, sandals, bathing suits, umbrellas, and all the other fun things to take to the beach. And, as always, make sure to bring your Pocket Ranger® mobile apps with you to make exploring and relaxing even easier!

Crowdfunding and a Constitutional Amendment

When we talk about state parks and state parks systems, we’re discussing the interweaving natures of the hard work and bureaucracy that make up anything that is government-run. It’s sometimes tricky, that political stuff, and not as fun as taking a hike or having a picnic with your favorite people. But no matter how far they seem from watching a sunset or listening to water cascade through a gorge, funding and votes and the internet are all important aspects of the preservation and enjoyment of our natural resources. Those resources, along with volunteering, friends groups, and even crowdfunding, have a role in the future of our parks and how we are able to interact with nature. Here are a couple of current events that elaborate on that point!

The Ball is in Your Court, Alabama Voters!

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Nature!

When we think of our favorite state parks, we don’t often think of stuffy legislative chambers, but there is no state parks system without them. [Image: www.alabamapolicy.org/]

Last September, we wrote a blog post about how the Alabama State Parks Division was facing a budget crisis that would result in the closure of five state parks on October 15. When the deadline hit, several of the parks began the road to closure. But because of the influence the parks have on local economies—particularly in terms of tourism revenue, sales of gas, and groceries—Florala was adopted by the City of Florala, and Dallas County made an agreement with the state to keep Paul Grist open for business.

Lovely water view, nearly lost to mismanagement of funds.

It’d be an injustice to lose access to the soothing views at Paul M. Grist State Park. Thanks for sparing us, Dallas County! [Image: www.ruralswalabama.org/]

As a quick refresher, the crisis boiled down to the transfer of more than $30 million out of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources coffers (half of which came from the state parks) over five years. That money settled in the state’s General Fund and was then distributed to cover deficits in other government agencies.

On March 22, the Alabama House of Representatives, in response to community backlash after those five parks were defunded, set in motion an amendment to the state’s constitution that would protect the state parks system’s funding from those damning transfers. The people of Alabama will get to vote on the state parks’ futures in November, and if the amendment passes, the parks will be guaranteed the revenue they earn, which will dramatically improve the parks department’s ability to maintain and make progress.

3 pts!

That’s right, the ball’s in your court—you’ve got this, Alabama! [Image: www.gifbin.com/]

Build some Cabins, Build the Future!

Speaking of making progress: Cape Henlopen State Park is a popular and polished jewel in the crown of Delaware’s state parks system, and it is seeking your help. The park started a Kickstarter campaign succinctly named “Help Us Bring More Camping Cabins to Cape Henlopen State Park.” The park is seeking to offset some of the costs of building new cabins that will be ready to serve the public by Memorial Day. By backing the campaign, you can earn great rewards, like being the first to stay in one of the new cabins. Or if you pledge at the top tier, you can act as the park manager for a day.

Beach views for days!

Clearly Cape Henlopen State Park is a pretty special place. And you can make wonderful memories here or contribute to someone else’s by helping the park in its Kickstarter campaign! [Image: www.detsa.org/]

Thousands of visitors make their way from across the First State and farther to take in its ocean and bayside beaches, historic fort and lighthouse, dune-strewn scenery, and its many well-kept amenities. But it, as all state parks and state parks systems, is subject to budgets (and budget cuts) and grant allocations from state or federal sources, since the cost of keeping the lights on and maintaining facilities is almost always greater than what is brought in by the monies collected for park use, like day-use entry fees or the price of a campsite. These fees are generally kept to a minimum or are non-existent because these beautiful, natural spaces are meant to be accessible to everyone. Crowdfunding is a way to directly impact the park and its projects if you can’t get out and help clear a trail, remove fallen trees, paint buildings, or any of the other types of tasks one might do while volunteering. With technology, there are a million ways you can be a force for good in the state parks world.

Or if you’re more the immediate action, hands-on type, visiting a state park is always the best advocacy for their relevance and importance in our modern lives. You can, as always, download the Pocket Ranger® mobile apps and plan your trip today!