Tag Archives: angling

2017 NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament Continues through February

NYS Winter Fishing Tournament Continues through February

OSWEGO COUNTY – The 2017 NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament is considered the largest winter fishing tournament ever conducted in NY state, the NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament continues through the end of February. The event features seven categories of fish to target, a catch-and-release event for trout and pike, 58 weigh-in locations, and a prize structure that tops $80,000 in sponsored cash and prizes from over 50 sponsors making this event one of the most sponsored tournaments in the country.

Anglers fishing in the tournament can visit three local businesses — All Seasons Sports and Salmon River Sports Shop in Pulaski, and App’s Bait and Tackle in Cleveland — to weigh in their catches.

Angler catches a steelhead fish at a tournament

Anglers fishing Oswego County waters can enter their catches for the New York State Winter Classic at three Oswego County tackle shops: All Season Sports and Salmon River Sports in Pulaski, and App’s Bait and Tackle in Cleveland. Pictured holding a steelhead he released back into the Oswego River is Tommy Quinzi. Photo courtesy of Capt. Kevin Davis, Catch the Drift Guide Service

“This will be the third year for this statewide event and it continues to grow with more anglers getting involved and larger prizes to the winners,” said tournament organizer Tim Thomas. “The event allows anglers to fish any waterway in NY state, any time between Jan. 1 and Feb. 28, using any legal angling method, to target seven categories of fish. ”

Live leaderboards on the website keep anglers updated in near real-time throughout the event for both the main event and weekly awards. This year’s event features two large prizes: a $2,500 cash grand prize sponsored by Clam Outdoors (to be given to one of the first place finishing anglers by random draw) and a Case canoe with graphics wrap and fishing accessories for the overall largest fish entered.

Additional prizes include weekly, monthly, and overall prize packages, product specific awards, female angler awards, species specific awards including a $1,500 stainless steel artistic steelhead mount by world-renown artist Steve Nielsen, door prizes, and angler achievement awards for catching fish of substantial size.

Registered anglers will also have a chance at 58 shanties being given away in raffles – every weigh-in location has one to give away. Anglers can gain entries either by registering for the event or bringing fish in to the stations during the event (one entry per angler per day per location per fish). Registration is $25/angler ($35/angler with the optional lunker pool) and anglers can register at most weigh-in locations or online at www.nyswinterclassic.com.

“The New York State Ice Pro-Am Corporation in association with Finders Keepers Sportfishing continues to strive to offer exposure for the New York State fishery through their tournament events and sponsor connections to promote the industry and encourage tourism,” said Thomas. ” These tournament events have been very successful at offering new product companies and tackle shops exposure to turn profits.”

For more tournament information, contact Thomas at (585) 330-0494 or email info@FKsportfishing.com or visit www.NYSwinterclassic.com.

For Oswego County fishing conditions and visitor information go to www.visitoswegocounty.com or call 1-800-248-4FUN.

Fishing with Flair

When it comes to fishing, camping, and pretty much everything outdoors, look no further than the Pocket Ranger® video channel. The video channel gives you a front seat into the world of up-and-coming adventurers, such as contributor Andrew Flair, bass fishing extraordinaire. Flair is a far cry from your run-of-the-mill angler, making fishing look like a piece of cake. He’s even got his own website, Fishing with Flair, dedicated to showing people what bass fishing is all about. Just watch below as he reels in a gigantic five-pound bass:

Flair likes the outdoors, enjoys hanging out with friends, and goes to school. But don’t be fooled—Andrew Flair is no ordinary Gen Z’er. Discovering his passion at a young age, he is active in local angling clubs, maintains a fabulous following on social media with his fishing tackle reviews, and has placed in state competitions on more than one occasion. Flair has an unbelievable knack to bring award-winning bass fish home in the blink of an eye, like in this video below:

Want to know how you can catch your next big one? By subscribing to the Fishing with Flair’s YouTube channel, you’ll get reviews on top of the line fishing gear along with great tips that’ll give you a head start on your next outing. These videos are worth watching, whether you are at the cabin or at your desk. Get the very latest from Fishing with Flair by liking him on Facebook and following him on Twitter and Instagram.

Fishing with Flair brings fishing to your doorstep! So what are you waiting for? Watch him on the Pocket Ranger® video channel, where you can see the best of the best in outdoor adventure, education, and much more!

Fishing With Flair Screenshot from Pocket Ranger® Videos

Ready to launch the boat? Download the FREE Pocket Ranger® apps, and get all the information you need to have fun in whatever stream you choose to paddle up.

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Reel Adventures with Darcizzle Offshore

Watch out, guys—there’s a new girl rockin’ the boat, and she has a knack for catching anything off the Southern Florida coast. Watch the Pocket Ranger® video channel for fun and exciting fishing adventures brought to you by Darcizzle Offshore. Her name stands up to her reputation with jaw-dropping videos that reel you in and never let you go! To get you started, watch her bass fishing expedition:

Darcizzle Offshore host, Darcie, takes fishing to another level. Her skill behind a fishing rod and experience handling the deep unknown captivate audiences, “showing the world girls CAN fish too, one catch at a time.” Whether you are an avid angler or experience fish only when it’s on your plate, follow her blog for the latest updates. The videos are nonstop entertainment and know-how, showing the best ways for a successful fishing trip. In the below video, Darcie invites viewers on a lobster dive, giving step-by-step instructions on how to find the big ones and bring them to your table:

Enough to make your mouth water, right? By subscribing to Darcizzle Offshore’s YouTube channel, you can get an angling education from someone who has done it her entire life, which far surpasses what you could get trying to learn on your own. You can also follow her on Twitter and Instagram then like her on Facebook. By following her on Google+, you can stay up-to-date on what’s happening in the world of Florida fishing, including monthly fishing reports, events, and more. Darcie also likes to help promote partners and sponsors, often bringing them along on her adventures.

Darsizzle Offshore using a speargun to catch fish

Image Credit: Darcizzle Offshore

Visit the Pocket Ranger® video channel to watch Darcizzle Offshore bring in the big catch! The video channel is filled with entertainment from contributors like Darcie who are dedicated to showing you a good time and inspiring your next trip. Before you pack your bags and ready your tackle box, download the Pocket Ranger® mobile apps for the latest in travel information, weather, and things to do. The Pocket Ranger® apps are free and fully equipped with GPS features to make your next adventure a stellar one!

Yakking for Bass: Pros and Cons for Kayak Bass Fishing

Contributed by Alex Vail, The Flying Kayak

With kayak fishing’s popularity on the rise, many anglers find themselves leaving the power boat at home and hopping into a small plastic boat instead. Perhaps you’re thinking about giving kayak fishing a try, too. Or maybe the thought has yet to even cross your mind. Either way, as an avid kayak angler myself, I’ve thrown together a list of pros and cons for kayak fishing for largemouth bass. This list is intended to neither persuade nor dissuade someone from giving kayak fishing a try. Its sole purpose is to inform.

Pros:

Stealth– Let’s face it—kayaks are the stealthiest watercrafts available. Their lack of motor and low profile makes them incredibly sneaky. Fish simply don’t know a kayak is nearby. I’ve had fish strike lures just mere inches away from the kayak solely because they didn’t know I was there. With no motor noise, the only sound that should be coming from the kayak is the swishing of the paddle and you, as the angler, are in control of exactly how loud you want to be. In addition, sitting down low in a kayak means that there’s a much smaller chance that a fish is going to see you skylined from below. These things combined means that an angler is going to have a MUCH better chance of catching those fish.

Kayaking for bass

Shallow Water– Kayaks are known for being able to handle skinny water with ease. Usually only drafting a couple of inches, they make those impossible-to-reach places for power boats a real possibility. Also, many of those shallow, weed-choked areas that lunkers like to hang out in suddenly become accessible. With no prop to get stuck, an angler can glide right into the vegetation with little to no trouble.

Fishing for bass

Cost- Aside from the initial cost, kayaks are extremely easy on the wallet. Now, I understand we’re all fisherman, and we love to have our gadgets, but as far as everything else goes, kayaks are cheap. Since you’re the primary means of propulsion, the only fuel needed is food for yourself. There will never be that cringe at the gas pump when you’re done filling up. In addition, maintenance is extremely low. Wash the kayak off if it gets muddy and…that’s about it. No flushing the engine. No fiddling with bow lights. They’re cheap to use. You’ve just got to get them to the water; the same as you would with any boat.

 

Kayak-on-a-truck

 

Cons:

Range/speed– This one is a big one and has probably crossed your mind already. Your fishing areas are limited to exactly how much you want to paddle. I personally wouldn’t suggest trying to fish something beyond 4-5 miles away for a half day trip. Power boats have that awesome ability to crank the motor and go. Thirty to forty mph sounds a lot better than 3-4 mph doesn’t it?

Room- Probably the most limiting factor aside from range is the amount of room available in a kayak. An angler constantly finds himself struggling to make things fit. Now, if you fish bare bones like I often do, this isn’t much of an issue. A tackle box, seat, couple of rods, paddle, and water all fit in the kayak with room to spare. It’s when you start tossing in things like fish finders, live wells, coolers, etc, that space quickly becomes an issue. There’s simply more room to comfortably fit things on a boat. Plus there’s the luxury of being able to walk around without the threat of capsizing.

Inclement Weather- Though all boaters have to consider the possibility of foul weather, kayakers have to take special note. When you’re 1-2 hours away from the dock in the kayak and a huge storm brews up, it’s not as if you can suddenly put the motor in the water and run. You’re forced to paddle away at what always feels like a snail’s pace. Though foul weather doesn’t take as big of a toll in protected waters, it becomes a real issue in big open water. High winds and waves can turn a pleasant day of kayaking into a real chore. Even though today’s fishing kayaks are extremely stable, one still runs the risk of capsizing when faced with extremely rough water on big open lakes.

 

Bass-on-a-kayak

 

So, if you’re considering giving kayak fishing for bass a try, be sure to really think about these pros and cons. These are, of course, just a few of the many things one must take into account when deciding if kayak fishing is something to get into. But if these pros outweigh the cons, seriously give kayak fishing a shot. Talk to local kayak dealers and test different paddle styles before deciding on what’s right for you. Also, try talking to fellow fisherman who already kayak fish. There’s a wealth of knowledge that’s ready to be shared by experienced paddlers, and they’re almost always more than willing to help another angler take his first steps into buying one of those plastic boats. Just be ready; kayak bass fishing can be a blast!

5 Great Nonfiction Books for Hunters and Anglers

Now that you’ve got those Christmas giftcards, it’s time to treat yourself or that uncle you forgot about to a great read. Here at ParksByNature, not only do we love nature, we also love good prose. Whether it’s hunting, angling, or general nature writing that interests you, these five essential nonfiction books for hunters and anglers will dazzle readers with their style, wit, and insight into the mysterious realm of nature.

image: www.dogeardiary.blogspot.com

Image: www.dogeardiary.blogspot.com

1. The Hidden Life of Deer by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

Whenever we recommend this book to serious deer hunter friends of ours, the usual response is: “you mean that tree hugger?” If a tree hugger is somebody who spends more time in the woods than shopping at Cabelas, then count us in. Instead of telling you how deer should behave, this book records how deer actually behave. In The Hidden Life of Deer, Thomas weaves personal memoir, anthropological perspective, and a certain observational grace into a beautiful and revealing portrait of deer in the woods of New Hampshire. We’re not ashamed to say that a lot of what we know about deer hunting and behavior comes from this unique book.

image: www.goodreads.com

Image: www.goodreads.com

2. The Founding Fish by John McPhee

John McPhee is master stylist who has chronicled everything from basketball to the history of the Florida orange. He also happens to be a lifelong shad fisherman. The Founding Fish is a cultural history of American shad fishing that seamlessly blends meticulous scholarship with the ease and locality of travel writing. The book follows McPhee as he travels up and down the Eastern seaboard fishing for the mercurial shad and meditating on the fish’s importance to America’s dietary past. Did you know that George Washington’s Continental Army might have starved if it wasn’t for the spring shad run of 1778?

image: www.3riversarchery.com

Image: www.3riversarchery.com

3. A Man Made of Elk by David Petersen

This is an unusual and still obscure entry into the annals of hunting literature. One of the reasons for its slow reception is that Petersen is a dedicated traditionalist who only hunts one animal, elk, and does so with longbow, a form of technology unchanged since the 1300’s. Since longbow hunting requires getting up close and personal with the animal, Petersen has learned to act and think like an elk. This is probably the closest thing we have to a book on elk hunting written by an elk.

image: www.azstateparks.com

Image: www.azstateparks.com

4. A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold

Leopold was a rare combination of philosopher, naturalist, conservationist, and hunter. A Sand County Almanac (1949) is a collection of personal essays about the wilderness of Wisconsin in which Leopold developed the modern philosophy of land conservation or “land ethic”. The book describes that era of conservation history when it was believed that the eradication of certain predatory species would increase the overall abundance of game. Leopold, as a hunter, was one of the first to see that an ecosystem was a far more complex matter.

image: www.biographile.com

Image: www.biographile.com

5. The Longest Silence by Thomas McGuane

You don’t have to be a trout fisherman to appreciate the tension and tug of McGuane’s prose. The Longest Silence is composed of 33 essays written over an equal number of years that take you everywhere from trout ponds in Michigan to fly fishing for bone fish in Florida. But the real subject of McGuane’s book is that mysterious and infinite silence between bites that every fisherman knows.