Tag Archives: somerset county chamber of commerce

2016 Somerset Antique Show

Contributed by Sheena Baker of Somerset County Chamber of Commerce.

Are you looking for a great, old piece of furniture to complement your home? Have you been trying to find a classic, one-of-a-kind gift for a friend or loved one? Do you enjoy stumbling upon unique treasures and hidden gems? You’ll find all of that and more during the 46th Annual Somerset Antique Show Saturday, August 13 on the streets of Uptown Somerset. Open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and held annually on the second Saturday of August, the street fair has long been a popular event with both area residents and out-of-town guests.

articles from somerset antique show

Antiques teach us a lot about the histories of utility and taste. Antique shows themselves teach us a lot about the importance of thrift, and a keen eye. [Image: Sheena Baker]

Each year more than 100 antique vendors set up their wares at this long-running show and offer everything from jewelry, glassware, furniture and coins to sports memorabilia, toys, quilts and military relics along with everything in between. Thousands are drawn to the streets of Somerset to peruse the Antique Show, eat at a variety of food booths and visit restaurants, coffee shops and quaint mom-and-pop stores in the historic uptown area.

Also included in the show is an Antique & Classic Car Show from noon to 2 p.m. in the Somerset Trust Co. parking lot along West Main Street.

While at the show, guests are encouraged to visit the information booth, located near the Civil War statue in front of the Somerset County Courthouse, to pick up information on the show as well as other upcoming festivals and area attractions.

Admission to the Somerset Antique Show is free and free parking is available in the lower levels of the Somerset County Parking Garage on East Catherine Street as well as at any legal metered parking space. The event is held rain or shine and those attending are asked to leave their pets at home. A few antique dealer spaces are still available.

For more information on the Somerset Antique Show, contact the Somerset County Chamber of Commerce at (814) 445-6431 or visit www.somersetpa.net. Information on the Antique & Classic Car Show can be obtained by contacting Somerset Trust Co. at (814) 443-9200.

Somerset is located in the Laurel Highlands of southwestern Pennsylvania, one hour east of Pittsburgh at exit 110 of the Pennsylvania Turnpike. From the Turnpike, make a right onto North Center Avenue (Pa. Route 601) and follow the signs for the Antique Show. From U.S. 219, take the Pittsburgh/Harrisburg exit and make a left onto North Center Avenue (Pa. Route 601) and follow the signs.

Exploring American History along the National Road

Contributed by Sheena Baker of Somerset County Chamber of Commerce

Earlier this year, we decided to explore the birth of a nation by traveling along the National Road through the Laurel Highlands of southwestern Pennsylvania.

The National Road—modern day U.S. Route 40—was the first federally funded highway in the U.S. and set a precedent for a national highway system and future public works projects. Beginning in Cumberland, Maryland, the route passes through the Cumberland Narrows (which was once one of only a few navigable routes across the Appalachian Mountain Range) before continuing northwest into Pennsylvania, across the Allegheny Mountains, and into the Ohio River Valley. The route’s earliest forms were buffalo trails and Native American footpaths. In the mid-1700s, Maryland frontiersman Thomas Cresap and Delaware Chief Nemacolin led an expedition to widen the trail for freight and trade into the Ohio Territory. From 1754–1755, Lieutenant Colonel George Washington and Major General Edward Braddock widened Nemacolin’s Trail farther during their failed campaigns to drive the French from Fort Duquesne in what is now Pittsburgh.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Sheena Baker

In 1806, the Jefferson Administration approved plans to build a multi-state national highway from Cumberland westward to open settlement into the Ohio River Valley and the Midwest. Following the route set forth by Nemacolin, Washington, and Braddock, construction on the National Road began in 1811 and reached Wheeling, West Virginia (then Virginia) in 1818. From there, the highway continued across Ohio, Indiana, and nearly all of Illinois before funding for the project ran dry in the 1830s.

From the late 1810s to the 1850s, the more-than 600-mile National Road served as a gateway to the west as the main route from the east coast to the U.S. interior. Today, 90 miles of the highway—sometimes referred to as the National Pike or the Cumberland Road—pass through southwestern Pennsylvania, including more than 40 miles in Somerset and Fayette counties in the Laurel Highlands, which was the focus of our exploration on this particular weekend.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Sheena Baker

Traveling from east to west as settlers would have in the 19th century, our first stop was at the Petersburg Toll House along Old Route 40 in Addison, Somerset County. When the National Road became too expensive to maintain in the 1830s, the federal government turned maintenance over to each individual state. Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia turned the highway into a toll road and constructed tollhouses every 15 miles to collect money to pay for the upkeep of the heavily traveled route.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Sheena Baker

Constructed in 1835, the Petersburg Toll House was known as Gate Number One, the first tollhouse in Pennsylvania across the Mason-Dixon Line. Now one of only three remaining tollhouses along U.S. 40, the structure serves as a museum that is open by appointment and is owned by the Great Crossings Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution.

After leaving Addison, we continued westward, crossing the Youghiogheny River Lake and passing centuries-old inns, houses, and other structures on our way to our next destination: Fort Necessity National Battlefield.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Sheena Baker

Inside the site’s impressive Interpretive and Education Center, we learned how precursors to the French and Indian War and the worldwide Seven Years War were fought in the Laurel Highlands. In the spring of 1754, a young 22-year-old Washington led a failed attempt to push the French from Fort Duquesne at the forks of the Ohio River in what is now Pittsburgh. Following a controversial skirmish at nearby Jumonville Glen, Washington suffered defeat at his “Fort of Necessity” and was forced to retreat. He returned the following year under the command of the somewhat inexperienced Braddock in another attempt to force the French from Fort Duquesne. Again the British were defeated, suffering more than 900 casualties, including Braddock whose grave is marked by a large monument along the highway one mile west of Fort Necessity. (Incidentally, the British finally forced the French from Fort Duquesne in 1758 under the leadership of General Edward Forbes, whose march westward helped shape the Laurel Highlands’ other historic highway: U.S. Route 30, aka the Lincoln Highway.)

In addition to offering a reconstructed version of Fort Necessity, interactive displays, and five miles of walking trails, Fort Necessity National Battlefield also details the history of the National Road. During our visit, we traveled back through time and learned about the highway’s construction, its decline during the industrial railroading age, and its rebirth as an automobile “motor touring” highway in the 20th century. The Mount Washington Tavern, a former stagecoach stop overlooking the reconstructed fort, is part of the Fort Necessity National Battlefield and serves as a museum depicting life along the National Road during its heyday.

Having known very little about the French and Indian War or the National Road before my visit to Fort Necessity, I left quite impressed and eager for more information on how both affected the history of the U.S. I would recommend anyone with an interest in history to visit the National Park Service site.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Sheena Baker

With a better understanding of what British troops and early settlers faced traversing southwestern Pennsylvania in the days before automobiles and other modern conveniences made travel so easy, we continued westward, keeping our eyes peeled for the white obelisk mile markers denoting the byway. Stone markers were initially placed at five-mile intervals on the south side of the National Road between Cumberland and Wheeling during the highway’s construction, but were later replaced by cast iron markers at one-mile intervals on the north side of the route in 1835.

At the top of Chestnut Ridge, we were treated to a stunning view of Uniontown and the surrounding countryside before descending into the valley below. Following Business Route 40, we navigated the streets of Uniontown, once a major center of business along the National Road.

Near the center of town, we stumbled upon the George C. Marshall Memorial Plaza, a tree-lined spot at the intersection of West Main and West Fayette Streets near Marshall’s boyhood home. Several statues and the Flags of Nations celebrate his life and narrative plaques tell Marshall’s story. The history and significance of the National Road, which passed through his hometown, was not lost on Marshall as a child and can be linked to his pursuit of a military career. Marshall rose to become a preeminent World War II General, U.S. Army Chief of Staff, Secretary of State, and Secretary of Defense, among his other notable achievements and positions. In 1953, he earned the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in developing the post-World War II European Recovery Program (better known as the Marshall Plan). According to History.com, Marshall is one of the most respected soldiers in U.S. history, second only to Washington, another famous George with ties to the region.

From Uniontown we continued our journey westward, stopping briefly to see the Searight Toll House. The structure is similar in design to the Petersburg Toll House and was also constructed in 1835. Searight Toll House is home to the “Off to Market” sculpture, one of five full-size, bronze outdoor sculptures constructed at specific locations for a National Road Sculpture Tour designed to augment visitors’ educational experiences in learning about the historic highway.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Sheena Baker

A few miles from the Searight Toll House, we reached our final destination: historic Brownsville on the banks of the Monongahela River. Like Uniontown and other hamlets along the National Road, Brownsville was once a major industrial hub as well as a center for steamboat construction and river freight hauling, eclipsing nearby Pittsburgh in size until the mid-1800s.

From Brownsville, the National Road continues onward through Washington County, into West Virginia, and beyond. Though the National Road officially ends in Vandalia, Illinois, today U.S. 40 stretches 2,285.74 miles across 12 states from New Jersey to Utah.

Examining Somerset County’s Agricultural Heritage Through Architecture

Contributed by Sheena Baker of Somerset County Chamber of Commerce

If you’ve ever driven through Pennsylvania, you’ve no doubt noticed the Keystone State is home to a plethora of barns. Some are red, some are white; some are simple, one-level buildings while others are multi-storied structures. I’ve even seen purple barns and round barns in my travels.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Sheena Baker

To the untrained eye, one barn may seem like any other, but that’s not always the case, especially in Somerset County where these common everyday structures often showcase the region’s agricultural heritage. An estimated 2,000 barns in America’s County® today are Pennsylvania barns, an architecturally distinct type of barn that originated in Pennsylvania in the mid-1700s and became Somerset County’s most preferred barn construction design in the late 19th century.

A Pennsylvania barn consists of two levels—an upper level and a lower level—to allow space for animals, hay, and farming equipment. Pennsylvania barns also feature two distinct characteristics. The first is an unsupported forebay, which is a cantilevered overhang that extends over the lower level of the barn. The second feature is an embankment leading to the barn’s upper level, permitting easy access to that second story.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Somerset County Chamber of Commerce Photos

Pennsylvania barns aren’t the only unique agricultural architecture found in Somerset County. A number of structures feature elaborate handcrafted barn decorations, including barn stars, shutterwork, brackets, columns, and cupolas that are exclusive to Somerset, Bedford, and Washington Counties in southwestern Pennsylvania, with the largest number appearing in Somerset County. These decorations have links to the Pennsylvania Dutch who brought a deep love of the land and barn-building with them to the New World. They also provide insight into the lives of early Somerset County farmers and the deep pride and passion they felt for their work.

Barn stars began appearing on Somerset County structures during the late 1800s with the last known star appearing in 1917. Not to be confused with painted Pennsylvania Dutch hex signs commonly seen in eastern Pennsylvania, barn stars were handcrafted from wood and applied directly to a barn’s siding. Some stars served a dual purpose as ventilators for the structure. An estimated 75–100 barn stars still remain on Somerset County barns today.

Image: Sheena Baker

Image: Somerset County Chamber of Commerce Photos

You too can explore Somerset County’s rich agricultural heritage through the self-guided “Somerset County Pennsylvania Barn Stars and Decorations Driving Tour Map & Guide,” which is available from the Somerset County Chamber of Commerce. The brochure highlights 19 of these numerous historic barns and barn decorations spread across Somerset County and includes details on their intricate, unique features and handcrafted decorations. All of the barns included on the brochure are also Pennsylvania barns.

The next time you find yourself in the countryside or on a back road near a farm, keep an eye out for these architecturally unique structures and works of art. You might just see more than a common everyday barn.

Fire and Ice Festival Brings Magic to Streets of Somerset

Contributed by Sheena Baker of Somerset County Chamber of Commerce

Fire and Ice Festival Sign at Somerset County

Image: Sheena Baker

Dazzling, intricate ice sculptures of all sizes have drawn thousands of visitors to the streets of Uptown Somerset, Pennsylvania each January since 1995.

Now in its 21st year, the annual Somerset Fire and Ice Festival has grown to offer more than just frozen works of art. Hosted each Martin Luther King Jr. Weekend by Somerset Inc., the event features something for everyone—from the young in age to the young at heart—with both indoor and outdoor activities held throughout Somerset over the three-day weekend.

The 2016 Fire and Ice Festival, set for January 15–17, should prove to be a magical weekend as this year’s event theme is “Fairy Tales Can Come True.” The geniuses at Mastro Gourmet Quality Ice will create more than 50 fairy tale-themed sculptures to line the streets of Somerset and will be on hand throughout the weekend to demonstrate just how they create such detailed works of art from blocks of ice. It’s truly fascinating to watch these artists fashion elaborate sculptures using chainsaws, grinders, chisels, and other heavy-duty tools. Over the years, Mastro’s maestros’ creations have included palm trees, teapots, dentures, a replica of the USS Somerset, and everything in between.

Palm Tree Ice Sculpture at Somerset Fire and Ice Festival

Image: Sheena Baker

While the ice sculptures take center stage at this popular event, they are far from the only draw to the Fire and Ice Festival. On Saturday, kids will enjoy the Fire and Ice Children’s Area located at First Christian Church and its youth activities, special displays, and appearances by and photos with princesses Anna, Elsa, and Cinderella. (We hear Spider-Man may also make an appearance.) The annual Teen Band Blast Friday evening at Somerset Area High School and a Teen Pool Tournament Saturday at the Boys & Girls Club of Somerset County will entertain teenagers, too.

kid next to ice sculpture of a car at the Somerset County Fire and Ice Festival

Image: Sheena Baker

For those with a competitive spirit—or anyone looking to shed a few holiday pounds—the festival offers a 5K Walk/Run Saturday morning. Shutter bugs can enter the Fire and Ice Photo Contest and then view the entries on display Uptown. Other competitions include a photo/trivia Scavenger Hunt and a fairy tale-themed Window and Interior Decorating Contest for area businesses.

Be sure to come hungry. Not only does Uptown Somerset boast a number of great restaurants and coffee shops, but the festival itself offers a multitude of opportunities for tasty treats and venues with good food. The Kiwanis Club of Somerset will host its popular Pancake Breakfast at the Fraternal Order of Eagles Saturday morning. Local service clubs, organizations, and restaurants will vie for top honors in the Fire and Ice Hot Stuff! Chili and Soup Cookoff at the American Legion later in the day. First Christian Church will serve up a soup sale, and the Somerset Volunteer Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary will offer a Sunday Roast Beef Dinner. Food vendors will also be set up throughout the weekend.

Pancakes Ice Sculpture from Fire and Ice Festival

Image: Sheena Baker

The ever-popular Michael O’Brian Band headlines the festival’s entertainment lineup, taking the stage Saturday evening at the American Legion. The Roof Garden Barbershop Chorus will also be providing strolling entertainment throughout the weekend.

An eclectic array of vendors and crafters will fill the basement of Newberry Place at the festival’s Marketplace, and a number of silent auction items will be up for grabs at Fire and Ice Headquarters (also located in the Newberry Place basement). Uptown Painting Parties, held in the neighboring Glades Court Mall, are scheduled throughout the festival weekend, and the Laurel Highlands Model Railroad Club will have its winter display available for viewing at its location on West Main Street.

If all these activities weren’t enough, the festival also includes a fireworks display set off on the Diamond at the center of Somerset’s Uptown district at 6 p.m. Saturday. The vibrant pyrotechnic display puts the “fire” in the Fire and Ice Festival each year.

man making an ice sculpture at the fire and ice festival

Image: Sheena Baker

For a detailed schedule of events, visit the Fire and Ice Facebook page or the Somerset County Chamber of Commerce’s calendar of events. Also be sure to pick up an official 2016 Fire and Ice Festival Guidebook (available at area businesses) for a map of sculptures, discount coupons, and additional information on the event.

Want more winter festival fun? The Ligonier Valley Chamber of Commerce will hold its 25th Ligonier Ice Fest January 23–24, bringing back-to-back weekends of icy excitement to Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands!